Preventing Premature Babies From Developing Chronic Kidney Disease Later In Life By Combining Australia’s Advanced Imaging Techniques With Israeli’s Unique In Vivo Modelling

Premature babies have a significantly increased risk of developing Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) as they grow older, due to their kidneys being insufficiently developed at birth. Each year across the globe, more than 15 million babies are born prematurely. As these babies reach maturity, the number of adults living with CKD will rise exponentially.

Chronic kidney disease is a devastating illness that affects more than 2 million people globally. One in every 1,400 Australians require regular dialysis or a kidney transplant in order to survive. This places an estimated burden of $320 million annually on the healthcare system in Australia alone.

A recent collaborative research study between Australia and Israel has found that the deletion of a specific gene found in the stem cells of embryonic kidneys, could improve kidney development in utero. This project builds on that finding and may provide hope for people at high risk of developing kidney disease in adulthood and revolutionise the care of premature infants by identifying interventions in pregnancy and at birth which may protect the developing kidney from the effects of prematurity. 


Each year across the globe, more than 15 million babies are born prematurely.


For further information regarding this significant research project, please contact our Development Directors.